Outside of EURUSD, what other currency pairs do you trade with Grid Fusion?

Cycletrader

Forex High School Teen
I've been looking at USDCHF and think that I see excellent conditions for a Grid Fusion set up.
It has stayed tightly packed in a range of ~1,200 pips for the last 5 years!
I mean, how neat do you want it???

Check it out on the weekly chart:

920

Obviously you cannot go by historical records, anything can happen...but this range is very very solid.
You could plan for a "worst case historical" scenario of 1,200 pips to start with, and know that you are planning on a trend that has been consistent for quite a few years. To add some security you can plan more safety measures by taking it up to 1,500...1,800 pips...etc.....but you know that at 1,200 you will most probably have a pretty serious resistance playing a role.

You can pretty much eyeball it, but when I ran my backtests, this was the obvious spot around Jan - Mar 2018 where USDCHF went without a "close enabling" retracement for around 890 pips (there were 2 more zones that also came around the same amount of pips):
921

So let's say that if I would make my planning based on this...I would have to AT LEAST be prepared to face a 900 pip trend against my grids.

What do you think?
Good idea? Bad?
 
Last edited:

Sharkman

Forex Intern
I've been looking at USDCHF and think that I see excellent conditions for a Grid Fusion set up.
It has stayed tightly packed in a range of ~1,200 pips for the last 5 years!
I mean, how neat do you want it???

Check it out on the weekly chart:

View attachment 920

Obviously you cannot go by historical records, anything can happen...but this range is very very solid.
You could plan for a "worst case historical" scenario of 1,200 pips to start with, and know that you are planning on a trend that has been consistent for quite a few years. To add some security you can plan more safety measures by taking it up to 1,500...1,800 pips...etc.....but you know that at 1,200 you will most probably have a pretty serious resistance playing a role.

You can pretty much eyeball it, but when I ran my backtests, this was the obvious spot around Jan - Mar 2018 where USDCHF went without a "close enabling" retracement for around 890 pips:
View attachment 921

So let's say that if I would make my planning based on this...I would have to AT LEAST be prepared to face a 900 pip trend against my grids.

What do you think?
Good idea? Bad?
I love that you are thinking outside the box @Cycletrader :D(y)
Will certainly take a look at this idea with more time (y)
 

Tedster

Currently attending Forex kindergarden
I've been looking at USDCHF and think that I see excellent conditions for a Grid Fusion set up.
It has stayed tightly packed in a range of ~1,200 pips for the last 5 years!
I mean, how neat do you want it???

Check it out on the weekly chart:

View attachment 920

Obviously you cannot go by historical records, anything can happen...but this range is very very solid.
You could plan for a "worst case historical" scenario of 1,200 pips to start with, and know that you are planning on a trend that has been consistent for quite a few years. To add some security you can plan more safety measures by taking it up to 1,500...1,800 pips...etc.....but you know that at 1,200 you will most probably have a pretty serious resistance playing a role.

You can pretty much eyeball it, but when I ran my backtests, this was the obvious spot around Jan - Mar 2018 where USDCHF went without a "close enabling" retracement for around 890 pips (there were 2 more zones that also came around the same amount of pips):
View attachment 921

So let's say that if I would make my planning based on this...I would have to AT LEAST be prepared to face a 900 pip trend against my grids.

What do you think?
Good idea? Bad?
This looks pretty good considering that "small" range this pair has historically (y)
 

Dentalgorithm

Forex Grad
I've been looking at USDCHF and think that I see excellent conditions for a Grid Fusion set up.
It has stayed tightly packed in a range of ~1,200 pips for the last 5 years!
I mean, how neat do you want it???

Check it out on the weekly chart:

View attachment 920

Obviously you cannot go by historical records, anything can happen...but this range is very very solid.
You could plan for a "worst case historical" scenario of 1,200 pips to start with, and know that you are planning on a trend that has been consistent for quite a few years. To add some security you can plan more safety measures by taking it up to 1,500...1,800 pips...etc.....but you know that at 1,200 you will most probably have a pretty serious resistance playing a role.

You can pretty much eyeball it, but when I ran my backtests, this was the obvious spot around Jan - Mar 2018 where USDCHF went without a "close enabling" retracement for around 890 pips (there were 2 more zones that also came around the same amount of pips):
View attachment 921

So let's say that if I would make my planning based on this...I would have to AT LEAST be prepared to face a 900 pip trend against my grids.

What do you think?
Good idea? Bad?
I'll be looking into this one this year (y)
Looking to diversify my pairs with Grid Fusion.
 

Fnx

Forex Tourist
I am taking a look at EURCHF
I think if you set up different configuration files for each direction....they are quite consistent...this could be a very interesting one.
 

Applepine

Forex Trader
I've been looking at USDCHF and think that I see excellent conditions for a Grid Fusion set up.
It has stayed tightly packed in a range of ~1,200 pips for the last 5 years!
I mean, how neat do you want it???

Check it out on the weekly chart:

View attachment 920

Obviously you cannot go by historical records, anything can happen...but this range is very very solid.
You could plan for a "worst case historical" scenario of 1,200 pips to start with, and know that you are planning on a trend that has been consistent for quite a few years. To add some security you can plan more safety measures by taking it up to 1,500...1,800 pips...etc.....but you know that at 1,200 you will most probably have a pretty serious resistance playing a role.

You can pretty much eyeball it, but when I ran my backtests, this was the obvious spot around Jan - Mar 2018 where USDCHF went without a "close enabling" retracement for around 890 pips (there were 2 more zones that also came around the same amount of pips):
View attachment 921

So let's say that if I would make my planning based on this...I would have to AT LEAST be prepared to face a 900 pip trend against my grids.

What do you think?
Good idea? Bad?
I've been trading USDCHF for a few days now...so far so good :)
The return can be a bit less than with EURUSD, but this pair could be perceived as incurring less risk...so that's the trade off
 

Splash

Serious Forex Trader
I've been trading USDCHF for a few days now...so far so good :)
The return can be a bit less than with EURUSD, but this pair could be perceived as incurring less risk...so that's the trade off
What gap are you using? Same as in EURUSD?
 
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